In the beginnings of mobile computing, password databases were utilitarian, light and bare-bones(e.g.). Eventually, companies added features like desktop synchronization and fancier user interfaces in order to differentiate themselves from their competition. SPB Software then set a new standard with SPB Wallet, a program that combined a “real” database(aka more than one field) with secure encryption and beautiful looks(review at our sister site TamsPPC). Resco’s IDGuard is set to trump them all – can it stack up?

While most password managers are limited to a single database, this one can use more than one database. This can be useful for “sharing” passwords with others on the same handheld – just create a private and a shared database, and keep the private database’s password to yourself:
0 Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

0a Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

0b Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

A database’s contents can be displayed in various forms – the images below show a few of the hundreds of variations the flexible rendering engine can generate:
1a Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

1b Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

1c Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

1d Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

1e Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

Text entered while the application is running acts as a filter – this initially confused me a bit, as the area at the bottom is not a text field and can not be focussed. Tapping around doesn’t help one bit – type blindly and the “field” shall accept your input:
2a Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

IDGuard continues the database mantra pioneered by SPB. Data is stored in “objects” containing various data fields – each object has an associated “template” that determines what fields it contains. Our evaluation version contained a few templates:
3a Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

Creating new templates is very easy:
4a Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

The program can lock itself when idle; and can import existing data from various data sources; data can be exported to HTML, XML and CVS formats.
5a Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

5b Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

Essentially, we now have a fully-functional password manager. But IDGuard wouldn’t be a Resco app if it didn’t have a zinger feature…let’s all welcome binary attachments. Binary attachments is an incredibly useful feature that allows you to protect files found on your memory card by attaching them to an object(which takes a bit of timer as the files must be compressed):
6a Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

6b Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

Once the files are attached to a card, they are stored in an encrypted form. Tapping on them “beams” them into the application that’s set up as their default handler – this, unfortunately, could become a security issue if the viewer application isn’t as secure:
7a Resco IDGuard beta reviewed   looking at Rescos password manager

This review looked at a beta version of IDGuard on a Treo 680. The version was designated as IDGuard 1.00 and needs approximately 400k of RAM. The application was perfectly stable in my tests; however, Resco advises customers not to save important data in it yet as the database formats may change once more before release, making all stored data unreadable…

In the end, IDGuard calms my paranoia…data theft experiences like the one I had a few days ago should now be a matter of the past. Our friends ship an excellent password manager; and then proceed to completely 0wn all competitors with its binary attachment feature. If you are willing to accept the slightly steep learning curve, get this as soon as it ships!

Related posts:

  1. News on IDGuard
  2. Resco releases IDGuard companion for Windows
  3. Resco IDGuard updated
  4. Resco IDGuard versus SplashID – What’s in your pocket?
  5. Resco IDGuard will get a desktop component

3 Responses to “Resco IDGuard beta reviewed – looking at Resco’s password manager”

  1. Is the Datebase stored on Card?

  2. Hello,
    which database are you referring to?

    Best regards
    Tam Hanna

  3. password managers are great, but they don’t help if you don’t have a good password to begin with – it shocks me that people still use their birthdays and kid’s names as their passwords.

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