Even though MobileFun’s advertising is currently focused on iPhone 5 cases, they nevertheless sent our reviewer Oliver W Leibenguth a sample of one of their styli. He has performed an accurate review – let’s see if the thing stacks up!

First we have to talk about the technical background behind all this:

In earlier days (the time before the first iPhone) all manufacturers used resistive Touchscreens in their PDAs and Smartphones. They offered a high resolution but had to be used with a stylus and lacked multitouch-capabilities.

Now we all use smartphones with capacitive Touchscreens: they offer multitouch capabilities and can be used with your fingers… or better said: they *have* to be used with your fingers. Stylus-Operation is, by design, not possible (Unless you own a Galaxy Note or a HTC Flyer that have that feature due to a modified digitizer and a special stylus). That means that you can’t do drawings or handwritten notes like you used to do – drawing and writing with your finger just doesn’t work right (unless you are a master with finger paint…)

But there are stylii available for capacitive Touchscreens: Most of them have big tips made out of a sponge-like material or rubber that simulate the user’s finger. The results are quite disillusioning: Ok, you’ve got a pen… that is exactly as inaccurate as your fingers are.

But now we’re looking at someting I’d like to call the „second generation of capacitive stylii“:
0 DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

Actually, this looks like an ordinary ballpoint-pen with a protective cap.
1 DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

But the tip looks totally different…
2 DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

Dagi has built a stylus with a sharp tip that has a transparent disc attached to it. The disc has the diameter needed for the touchscreen to register its touch – and you can actually see, where and what you are drawing.
The disc itself is attached with a small spring that lets you tilt the pen in almost every possible angle without loosing contact to the touchscreen.
3a DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review
3b DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

I’m not an artist but with this pen I can draw and write almost as I would do with a regular ballpoint-pen on paper. There are some issues with certain apps that make use of multitouch-features that can lead to unwanted effects when you rest your hand on the touchscreen while using the pen.
4a DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review
4b DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

What‘s in the box?
5 DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

- the stylus ;-)
- a replacement tip
- 5 replacement glide-pads that reduce the friction of the disc (one is already attached)
- a (very) small piece of paper with instructions on how to replace the tip

The pen (30 EUR) is quite pricey compared to those with rubber tips, but if you need a stylus that actually works, this pen is worth every cent. Thanks to mobilefun UK for supplying the sample used in this review.

Related posts:

  1. MobileFun Dot Gloves for capacitive screens – review
  2. Dell Mini 5 – the return of the Stylus
  3. Proporta 3-in-1 stylus for Treo 600 review
  4. The Boxwave Styra(3-in-1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review
  5. Belkin 4-in-1 Stylus Pen Review

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