Even though MobileFun’s advertising is currently focused on iPhone 5 cases, they nevertheless sent our reviewer Oliver W Leibenguth a sample of one of their styli. He has performed an accurate review – let’s see if the thing stacks up!

First we have to talk about the technical background behind all this:

In earlier days (the time before the first iPhone) all manufacturers used resistive Touchscreens in their PDAs and Smartphones. They offered a high resolution but had to be used with a stylus and lacked multitouch-capabilities.

Now we all use smartphones with capacitive Touchscreens: they offer multitouch capabilities and can be used with your fingers… or better said: they *have* to be used with your fingers. Stylus-Operation is, by design, not possible (Unless you own a Galaxy Note or a HTC Flyer that have that feature due to a modified digitizer and a special stylus). That means that you can’t do drawings or handwritten notes like you used to do – drawing and writing with your finger just doesn’t work right (unless you are a master with finger paint…)

But there are stylii available for capacitive Touchscreens: Most of them have big tips made out of a sponge-like material or rubber that simulate the user’s finger. The results are quite disillusioning: Ok, you’ve got a pen… that is exactly as inaccurate as your fingers are.

But now we’re looking at someting I’d like to call the „second generation of capacitive stylii“:
0 DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

Actually, this looks like an ordinary ballpoint-pen with a protective cap.
1 DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

But the tip looks totally different…
2 DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

Dagi has built a stylus with a sharp tip that has a transparent disc attached to it. The disc has the diameter needed for the touchscreen to register its touch – and you can actually see, where and what you are drawing.
The disc itself is attached with a small spring that lets you tilt the pen in almost every possible angle without loosing contact to the touchscreen.
3a DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review
3b DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

I’m not an artist but with this pen I can draw and write almost as I would do with a regular ballpoint-pen on paper. There are some issues with certain apps that make use of multitouch-features that can lead to unwanted effects when you rest your hand on the touchscreen while using the pen.
4a DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review
4b DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

What‘s in the box?
5 DAGi Capacitive Stylus   the review

- the stylus ;-)
- a replacement tip
- 5 replacement glide-pads that reduce the friction of the disc (one is already attached)
- a (very) small piece of paper with instructions on how to replace the tip

The pen (30 EUR) is quite pricey compared to those with rubber tips, but if you need a stylus that actually works, this pen is worth every cent. Thanks to mobilefun UK for supplying the sample used in this review.

The C-Pen was provided to us cortesy of MobileFun. It is a stylus intended only for the Samsung Galaxy S3. Nevertheless, we tested it on both the Galaxy S2 and the WeTab.

The box opens onto the side. There is not much to see except for the blister packing:
samsung cpen review 1a Samsung Galaxy S3 C Pen review samsung cpen review 1b Samsung Galaxy S3 C Pen review samsung cpen review 1c Samsung Galaxy S3 C Pen review

The Stylus feels pretty comfortable in the hand. You can see the comparison pic below showing it next to some classic pens from Parker:
samsung cpen review 2a Samsung Galaxy S3 C Pen review

The most notable point of the stylus is the non retractable 3mm rubber tip on the front, used for writing on the capacitive screen.
samsung cpen review 3a Samsung Galaxy S3 C Pen review

We tested it on the Galaxy S2, where is works moderately well. the success we got was mainly on the tapping front, ie tapping the icons. But is is borderline impossible to use the same in the note taking application.

On the WePad, no different results were obtained. We tried to draw a line, and all that we got was a dashed line in place of a straight line. Of course, the Windows 8 text recognition failed to do anything with this entry.

We can not conclude its performance on the Galaxy S3. However, we can debunk one rumor: the C-Pen’s back does NOT include the special technology needed for the Galaxy Note!

We will update the review once we receive a Galaxy S3 in our labs. Until then, it is safe to conclude that the stylus works (as unreliable as) any other capacitive stylus – the price of 20 GBP is a bit high for what it offers.

One of the most popular replacement accessories for Palm handhelds are the so-called 3-in-1 styli combining a ballpoint pen, a PDA nib and a reset pin into a tiny thingy that fits into a handheld’s stylus silo. Boxwave gladly sent me a sample of their so-called Styra – lets see how it stacks up!

Boxwave’s products ship via standard mail – the envelopes are rather unstuffed and don’t contain useless clutter:
envfront The Boxwave Styra(3 in 1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review envin The Boxwave Styra(3 in 1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review

The Styra itself ships in a small blister with ‘instructions’ on the back:
bfront The Boxwave Styra(3 in 1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review bback The Boxwave Styra(3 in 1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review

Congratulations go out to the product designer – the Styra looks very futuristic. The grey barrel and the transparent tip remind me of Belkin’s famous light stylus
jelly The Boxwave Styra(3 in 1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review

My E2′s stylus silo was heavily modified while it was customized – but the Styra still fits in perfectly:
fit The Boxwave Styra(3 in 1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review

Writing on a PDA is comfortable – I used a Boxwave UltraClear screen protector and was astonished by the smoothness (much smoother than Parker 45 on paper). Moving the nib over the Palm Tungsten E2′s screen takes next to no force.

Unscrewing the nib unveils the reset pin. The Styra is unique among styli for its metal pin – unneeded for Tungsten E2(can be reset with nib), but a must for TE… .
resettip The Boxwave Styra(3 in 1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review

Pulling the black cap off the Styra’s should reveal the ballpoint pen – but the cap simply didn’t come off. Three people tried to pull it off..to no avail. It took me 5 minutes to pry it off the first time…

The pen can also be accessed by unscrewing the reset pin to gain access to Boxwave’s custom charge. Writing quality is very good for compacts:
pen The Boxwave Styra(3 in 1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review paperoutput The Boxwave Styra(3 in 1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review charge The Boxwave Styra(3 in 1 stylus) for Tungsten E/E2 review

Overall, the Styra is a great replacement stylus for the classic Tungsten E series – but it isn’t perfect. While Boxwave is the first vendor to get paper output quality to a superior level, their annoying cap makes writing a nuisance at first (it improves over time). If you have the time to play around with the cap a bit, you will be awarded with an excellent stylus for just 11.95$.

Replacement styli for Palm handhelds have come in a plethora of varieties in the early 2000′s. Now, the selection has boiled down to a few basic kinds – the Martin Fields 4-in-1 is a classic example of the pen-laserpointer replacement variety that was pioneered by the OmniPen Pro from Boxwave.

Brando shipped the Martin Fields stylus traditionally via regular mail – however, the parcels now require ‘personal pickup’.
env The Martin Fields 4 in 1 stylus

The stylus itself ships in a nice orange blister. The first thing one notices about the stylus is its ‘glossy’ black finish. The black color reflects the light and looks really good – it somehow reminds me of car paint:
blister The Martin Fields 4 in 1 stylus

Martin Field’s stylus is rather big – here is a picture next to a few other styli and pens from various manufacturers:
styli The Martin Fields 4 in 1 stylus

Here is a picture of it next to a Palm Treo 600 and a Palm Tungsten T3:
treo The Martin Fields 4 in 1 stylus

The stylus and ballpoint tips can be accessed by rotating the bottom of the thingy left or right:
papernib The Martin Fields 4 in 1 stylus pdanib The Martin Fields 4 in 1 stylus

Working with the PDA tip is very comfortable – it slides over the screen protectors well and has a pretty paper-like writing feel which I like very much. Writing on Paper is also possible, albeit the output quality is not exactly on the high end side of things:
paper The Martin Fields 4 in 1 stylus

The shiniest feature of this stylus design is the laser pointer/torch combo integrated into its back. Martin Fields did a great job here, the integration looks extremely nice. The torch works well on a 5m range, and the laser pointer is excellent too.
btns The Martin Fields 4 in 1 stylus back The Martin Fields 4 in 1 stylus

Martin Fields made one fatal mistake – the torch switch acts as a toggle. If the torch mistakenly activates itself, you are rewarded with dead batteries.

Taking the stylus apart is easy – pull the top off to access the nibs, screw the back off to access the batteries(and remove the enclosure)
teardown The Martin Fields 4 in 1 stylus

Overall, this stylus is a great choice for everyone who wants a stylus and ergonomic external pointer for his (Palm OS) handheld or smartphone. It would have gotten a perfect score if t didn’t have the fatal flaw with the torch – nevertheless, the price of 19$ at Brando’s is justified(if just for the color).

Over the last few months, Proporta’s 3-in-1 styluses impressed with leakages and difficult-to-remove caps. However, the company seems to learn – and alas, my latest review sample was from a different manufacturer. Let’s see how it fares:

The stylus itself is packed into a nice blister:
 Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Treo 600 review  Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Treo 600 review
After unpacking, the stylus impresses with its color. It is lighter than my original Treo 600 stylus and doesn’t accumulate fingertips easily. I really like its looks…
 Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Treo 600 review
The stylus has a reset pin in the front. Accessing it works well, and I had no problems resetting my Treo 600:
 Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Treo 600 review
Pulling the back off was a real surprise – the mechanics have been greatly improved, pulling the cap off required next to no force!
 Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Treo 600 review
The pen’s output quality is really good and the charge showed absolutely no signs of leakage. There seems to be a reservoire in the lid, too – so they fixed the darn leakage problem. Proporta never had problems with the fit – the stylus fits into my Treo 600 beautifully, altough pulling it out requires a bit more force.

Overall, what should I say? Proporta’s 3-in-1 stylus division has(finally) grown up and delivered a product that’s worthy of the Proporta name. I searched wide and far to find something negative to mention in this review – but there is nothing. If you need a 3-in-1 or even just a replacement stylus for your Treo 600, get this one for 17.95$ at Proporta’s.

The Palm Tungsten T3 is a strange beast from a hardware manufacturer’s point of view. It can get bigger and smaller, and so does its stylus. While Palm never had problems getting the mechanics to work reliably, third parties never did a good job here. Now, someone at Brando’s invested a bit of thinking time into avoiding the mechanics – let’s see what he came up with.

I received my sample from Brando’s. Brando ships its products from Hong Kong via regular mail. Customs seem to leave the parcels alone, and I never received anything damaged yet:
 Brando 3 in 1 replacement stylus for Tungsten T3  Brando 3 in 1 replacement stylus for Tungsten T3  Brando 3 in 1 replacement stylus for Tungsten T3
The stylus itself was packed up in a small blister:
 Brando 3 in 1 replacement stylus for Tungsten T3  Brando 3 in 1 replacement stylus for Tungsten T3
The stylus fits into a Palm Tungsten T3 well. Pulling it out is a bit different, you need to pull the top out with your fingernails – this is no problem for me though. My fingernails are very short even for a male, but I still always got the stylus out of my Palm Tungsten T3 easily.
 Brando 3 in 1 replacement stylus for Tungsten T3

When expanding the stylus, it becomes way longer than the original stylus. One can say that it is the longest stylus ever seen on a PDA:
 Brando 3 in 1 replacement stylus for Tungsten T3  Brando 3 in 1 replacement stylus for Tungsten T3  Brando 3 in 1 replacement stylus for Tungsten T3
The pen is hidden underneath the plastic back. Pulling it off allows you to write on paper. Output quality is very good, no need to mention anything negative here.
 Brando 3 in 1 replacement stylus for Tungsten T3
Writing with this stylus feels very well, both on paper and on-screen. The length makes longer email sessions more comfortable and ergonomic!

Overall, this is the best replacement stylus for the Palm Tungsten T3 I ever saw. If you need a replacement stylus, this is the most comfortable way to go even if you don’t really need the pen. The price of 10$ is a steal for such a product…

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 Inka Pen

When it comes to PDA accessories, quality is the characteristic that gets my attention the most. It is always nice to have a product that you know will reward you for your investment.

The Inka Pen is a product designed with this standard of quality in mind. You know it’s a well made product when they offer you a lifetime warranty with it.
 Inka Pen

The Inka Pen starts with an stainless steel barrel or titanium depending on which model you buy. That said, you know this product will be well protected from any abuse that might occur. If you pull the bottom of it, an O-ring will release a small pen. The O-ring helps keep out water if it was being used in rainy conditions. The manufacturer states that this pen can be used in any condition due to its pressurized ink cartridge.
 Inka Pen

The design of the pen begins to impress when you screw off the bottom of the pen. A yellow delrin stylus appears. Delrin is an excellent material for a PDA stylus due to its natural lubricity and durability. I have tested this product for over a month now and love how easily this material glides on the surface of a PDA. The stylus does take some time to get to which is the only downside of the design.


 Inka Pen

Yes, it can even become a full sized pen. It isn’t very much fun writing when it is only half length, but when you put it all together, it assembles a very attractive, sleek pen.

The Inka pen is an excellent choice for someone who has room on their keychain or loves the outdoors. It will withstand any and all of the elements you throw at it…as long as you stay between -30 to 300F degrees. So stay off the surface of the sun, and you’ll love the quality of this pen!

Most people use Palm’s styli, that comes with nearly every Palm powered device. It’s a known issue, one gets cramps in his stylus-hand because the stylus is so thin, that you can’t hold it like a normal pen. Best approach to avoid this is getting a pen which has a builtin stylus, so you just have to switch from pen to stylus, and back.

One of those multi talents is the Belkin 4-in-1 Stylus Pen. It comes in quite a big box, one might say, but all out of paper, hence recyclability.
 Belkin 4 in 1 Stylus Pen Review
 Belkin 4 in 1 Stylus Pen Review
 Belkin 4 in 1 Stylus Pen Review

Nomen est omen – the Belkin 4-in-1 Stylus Pen covers four functions:

  • Stylus
  • Pencil
  • Red ballpoint
  • Black ballpoint

 Belkin 4 in 1 Stylus Pen Review
The technique behind the scenes is quite easy – yet you have to get used to it. There’re are four cartridges in the barrel and the one closest to the ground (or: at the bottom) comes out in most of the cases.
 Belkin 4 in 1 Stylus Pen Review

Compared to normal ballpoint pens, like the cheap Parkers, this one looks quite big, but multi-talents don’t imply smallness normally. Though, because of the low weight of the pen, you get used to it’s size without any harms.
 Belkin 4 in 1 Stylus Pen Review  Belkin 4 in 1 Stylus Pen Review

Also the writing quality is quite good, and it’s also comfortable for writing at school, where you have to write very fast from time to time – still no cramps, yay! The stylus tip is very soft, so exelent writing comfort on Palm is given too (even for insane coders using SrcEdit, like me).

Here’s a little comparison of a few other pens and the Belkin 4-in-1 Stylus Pen:
 Belkin 4 in 1 Stylus Pen Review

Before you place the order for Boxwave’s FlexiSkin case (which I reviewed last week), consider their stylus as well. Styra is a stylus that provides you with additional conveniences that are essential for the real world. This Stylus has a unique pen cover; the removable cap can be snapped onto the stylus.
 Boxwave Styra for Zire 72 review

It’s securely attached to the opposite end. The clear stylus tip is threaded into the metal body covering the reset pen. The black pen cap snaps off and on with little effort, but stays put.
 Boxwave Styra for Zire 72 review

The Styra features a ballpoint pen, an integrated reset tool, and a very durable construction.

Although the stylus tip itself is small enough to reset my Palm Zire 72, the sturdy metal reset tip will reset any PDA. The clear plastic stylus is a whole lot tougher than I had thought at first sight. The stylus fits into the appropriate slot perfectly.
 Boxwave Styra for Zire 72 review

All in all, this stylus offers well made construction, ink pen cap which snaps onto the clear stylus; model-specific fit; reset pin under the plastic tip. Boxwave made a quality stylus at an affordable price. I even threw out the Palm’s Zire 72 stylus and replaced it with this one.
Well done, Boxwave, well done.

Many companies sell stylus replacements. In the glorious days of the Vii, many kinds of styluses were sold. This variety reduced itself to styluses with pens-and we now review Proporta’s offering for the TE2.

Proporta’s stuff ships via regular mail. Stuff always arrives in a good condition:
 The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2  The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2

The stylus ships in a blister pack. A bit of tea is included with each product to simplify ‘aquaintance’:
 The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2  The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2  The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2
Palm’s original stylus is made of a very reflective kind of metal, while the Proporta one looks more like the housing of a T3. It looks very nice and fits the handhelds color well:
 The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2
Here are a few different styli. From left to right:Stock Vii, Stock TT, Cross MicroPen, Stock TE2, Proporta:
 The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2

Writing on-screen is comfortable! The tip is very smooth and big, writing with it is easy.

The pen can be revealed by pulling the nib off the stylus-this takes a lot of force though and is not easy. Writing on paper is ok for such a small thing:
 The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2  The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2
The output is quite good for such a small thing:
 The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2
A reset pin is contained in the back of the stylus. It works for most handhelds that cannot be resetted with the tip. Accessing the pin is a bit difficult though-you need to turn the back around 13 times-a bit too much for my taste.
 The Proporta 3 in 1 stylus for Tungsten E2
Overall, the stylus leaves a positive impression! Writing on-screen in very comfortable, and writing on paper works too. However, the mechanics are average. Opening the stylus tip is difficult, and unscrewing the reset tip takes a bit of time. In addition, I received a damaged component at first(was promptly exchanged). But this stylus still is way better than the stock one!

A few years ago, most handhelds didn’t have a (strong) backlight. Back then, styli with LED’s integrated into the tip were very popular! Over the last few years, most of them were discontinued. However, we at TamsPalm’s managed to find one that still is beeing manufactured for our WristPDA using readers!

The stylus ships in a blister very similar to most other Belkin offerings:
 Belkin Light Stylus review  Belkin Light Stylus review
It is rather thick and long enough for comfortable use. This image shows it next to a few other styli():
 Belkin Light Stylus review
The tip can be turned on by turning the back of the stylus around. This video shows the procedure. Once turned on, it is ready for use! Here are two photos that show how the screen is illuminated, this video(3gp, plays in TCPMP or QuickTime) gives a ‘hands-on view’. By the way, the tip is thin enough for resetting a WristPDA and a E2-a T3 cant do the trick.
 Belkin Light Stylus review  Belkin Light Stylus review
The stylus locked in the silo of a Palm V, a TE2 and a T3-these images show how it ‘blends in’:
 Belkin Light Stylus review  Belkin Light Stylus review  Belkin Light Stylus review
A Palm IIIc had problems holding the stylus in place. It fits in well, but falls out if you turn the handheld around:
 Belkin Light Stylus review
The battery can theoretically be exchanged, altough I never saw the model before. The tip of the battery can be used as reset pin:
 Belkin Light Stylus review
Overall, this can come in handy. The mechanics are good, and the light is bright. Belkin did a good job in regards to handheld compatibility-you can replace most handheld’s styli with it! If you use your WristPDA much, this stylus definitly is worth its price!

Many people like the idea of firmly integrating a pen into their handhelds. However, the high price for such gadgets made many people think twice. StylusCentral is currently selling the Cross MicroPen for just 4.99$-and we review it for you!

This stylus needs to be assembled before use-it consists of the pen part and an exchangeable nib that carries the screen part AND also connects to the stylus silo. The nib needs to be pressed onto the pen firmly and also in the right direction. My hands lacked the strength for the assembly, and a small gap stayed between pen and nib. However, using a table helped!
front Cross MicroPen review

This is the thinnest stylus I ever faced in my life. I gathered a few styli in this comparison photo(Cross, Brando TT 3in1, E2 PalmOne, Vii PalmOne):
styli Cross MicroPen review
When using the stylus on a touchscreen, you actually use the rubber cone on the connector of the stylus. This is bad, as the cone will likely be damaged when carrying the handheld around. Using a rubber cone for touch screen input is a new thing for me-but it works well. You have a bit more ‘feedback’ from the Digitizer surface, and writing feels more paperlike. The thinness of the stylus is annoying though-my thumb starts to hurt a tiny bit faster than with a T3 stylus. Also, the stylus lacks a reset pin. A T3 and a TE2 could be reset with the pen tip, but a Vii was not resettable.
stylus Cross MicroPen review
Writing on paper always was a domain of Cross-and this stylus makes no difference. You ‘expose’ the pen’s tip by turning the back:
pen Cross MicroPen review
Don’t ask why, but writing with this thing almost feels better than writing with a regular ball pen. The output looks a bit better than the Brando 3-in-1 stylus, here is a comparison photo.
paper Cross MicroPen review
One can use one nib with multiple kinds of handheld-dont ask me how this works. Cross says that the pen is compatible with quite a few handhelds, StylusCentral lists additional models. I tried fitting the stylus into a Tungsten E2. The stylus fits in, but doesn’t completely disappear into the silo:
te2fit Cross MicroPen review
A Vii prototype exhibited problems with locking onto the stylus-but the configuration was useable nevertheless.

Getting the nib off the pen is hard work though.

Overall, this item is difficult to rate. It does a good job as pen and stylus! It doesnt look or feel bad either. However, the stylus has major constructively deficiencies-the universal concept has a price. The stylus tip is exposed to damages, and the fit is not perfect either. But: 4.99$ is a good argument that compensates those difficulties. And-last but not least-this still is one of the nicest styli on the market…

Many companies debuted in multi-functional styli for handhelds in the glorious days of the Vii. Nowadays, most third party styli consist of a pda nib, a pen and sometimes a reset tool. Torches,… are no longer available. The OmniPen pro offers a laser pointer and a led torch in addition to PDA nib and ballpoint pen, but sacrifices fitting into the stylus silo-enough said, lets review!
Boxwave’s products ship in small envelopes:
shipenv The OmniPen pro review envside The OmniPen pro review
The OmniPen itself is packed into a blue box-the steel etui looks good and contains three spare batteries:
etuiclosed The OmniPen pro review etuiopen The OmniPen pro review

As already said, the OmniPen is huge. Here are comparison photos. The first one shows two Parker 45 pens and styli from different manufacturers(stock Vii, Palm TE2, Cross Micropen and Brando TT3 3-in-1). The second one shows a TT3 and a E2 in a Brando case for comparison:
pens The OmniPen pro review penhandheld The OmniPen pro review
The back of the pen has a black BoxWave label on it. In addition, there are two small buttons that control the torch and the laser pointer. The LED’s are at the very end btw:
buttons The OmniPen pro review leds The OmniPen pro review
The laser pointer works really well-you can see the red point sharply and clearly for at least 15m indoors. However, you can see small ‘uncleanness’ at very close range(less than 50cm):
laserclose The OmniPen pro review laserpoint The OmniPen pro review
The torch’s LED is pretty bright and emits light with a blue-pinkish hue:
torch The OmniPen pro review
Writing on-screen with this pen is very smooth. The tip is cone-shaped, the length and thickness of the pen make for a good feeling! The tip can be expanded by turning the dotted front of the OmniPen:
pdapoint The OmniPen pro review
Writing on paper feels well too. You expand the pen tip by turning the top of the pen the other way round. The output looks thicker than the output of the thin 3-in-1′s, altough it cannot verse the Parkers.
paper The OmniPen pro review
The three batteries can be exchanged by screwing the back off the OmniPen. The mines can probably be exchanged as well, but I didn’t yet find out how.

Overall, I like this thing. Don’t ask me why, but it feels comfortable while writing-and the laser pointer and torch are handy. This stylus is indeed capable to replace a ballpoint pen. It shoud work with every handheld with a resistive touchscreen-no more need to buy a new stylus for each handheld. However, the OmniPen pro is heavy and needs a lot of space in your pockets-if you permanentely are short of pockets, this is not the way to go!

Review – OmniPen Pro

Der OmniPen Pro vereint einen Laserpointer, eine LED-Taschenlampe, einen PDA-Stift und einen (normalen) Schreibstift in einem “Gerät”.

Das Paket:
shipenv The OmniPen pro review envside The OmniPen pro review
Das Stahletui sieht gut aus und enthält außerdem auch 3 Ersatzbatterrien:
etuiclosed The OmniPen pro review etuiopen The OmniPen pro review

Das Teil ist ziemlich groß. Hier einige Fotos zum Vergleich.
pens The OmniPen pro review penhandheld The OmniPen pro review
Hinten ist ein “Boxwave” Schriftzug angebracht. Mit zwei kleinen Knöpfen kann die Taschenlampe und der Laserpointer aktiviert werden. Die LEDs sind am Ende des Gehäuses:
buttons The OmniPen pro review leds The OmniPen pro review
Der Laserpointer ist in Gebäunden mindestens 15m weit gut und klar erkennbar. Bei weniger als 50 cm sieht man ihn allerdings unscharf:
laserclose The OmniPen pro review laserpoint The OmniPen pro review
Die Taschenlampen-LED ist ziemlich hell, das Licht ist weiß mit einem pinken Stich.
torch The OmniPen pro review
Auf dem Bildschirm lässt sich gut schreiben.Durch Länge und Breite ist angenehmes Arbeiten möglich. Die Spitze kann ausgefahren werden indem man an der markierten Stelle dreht:
pdapoint The OmniPen pro review
Auch auf Papier kann man angenehm schreiben. Wenn man an die o. g. Stelle in die andere Richtung dreht erscheint die Mine. Die Schrift ist etwas dicker als bei anderen Stiften, allerdigns nicht so dick wie bei Parker-Stiften.
paper The OmniPen pro review
Wenn man das Ende abschraubt kann man die Batterien entnehmen und austauschen. Wie man die Minen tauscht habe ich bisher nicht herausgefunden.

Ich mag den Stift. Man schreibt angenehm, hat eine helle Taschenlampe und einen Laserpointer. Funktionieren sollte der Stift mit jedem Touchscreen-Handheld. Problematisch könnte allerdings die Größe und das Gewicht sein.

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