Usually, readers read web sites and – sometimes – talk back. However, a TamsPalm reader who identified himself just as Carsten dropped off a few vintage handhelds at the Tamoggemon booth:
0a Palm User Meeting 2008 – an unexpected gift

I now own a Palm Tungsten T3, a Treo 650 and – really cool – a working Clie 770c(thanks to Clieler for pointing out the hold switch thingy).

A big thank you goes out to Carsten for the handhelds – /me always loves new handhelds!

It is a long-established tradition to bring along rare or otherwise interesting handhelds along to the PUM. Last year, we had a transparent Vii and a Palm Tungsten x420. This year, we were treated to a Dana Wireless and a – strangely non-working – Janam XP30:

Dana Wireless
The Dana Wireless is among the most boring handhelds ever – one picture says more than thousand words:
0a Palm User Meeting 2008   Janam XP30, Dana Wireless

Janam XP30
Do not ask me where this box came from, but it was in the locker in the center of the room:
1a Palm User Meeting 2008   Janam XP30, Dana Wireless 1b Palm User Meeting 2008   Janam XP30, Dana Wireless 1c Palm User Meeting 2008   Janam XP30, Dana Wireless

A Nexave employee gladly handet it out to me – unfortunately, the machine didn’t power up. Nevertheless, here are a few comparison images next to a Treo 680:
2a0 Palm User Meeting 2008   Janam XP30, Dana Wireless 2a Palm User Meeting 2008   Janam XP30, Dana Wireless

Frequent TamsPalm readers will definitely be familiar with Group Sense’s latest products(M70 and M70s) – a friendly Palm User Meeting visitor allowed me to take a few shows of one of the predecessor models. Here comes…the GSPDA M28:
0a A quick look at the GSPDA M28

First of all, the M28 is a “slider”-type phone. The bottom must be slid down in order to expose the (rather small but usable) keyboard:
1a A quick look at the GSPDA M28

Specs-wise, the two devices are very similar. However, the M70 has Bluetooth and some sort of NVFS – two features missing on the M28:
2a A quick look at the GSPDA M28

Last but not least, here’s a picture of the devices shipment box. The M28’s hardware bundle is said to contain an extra charger for spare batteries – an accessory missing from the M70’s bundle.
3a A quick look at the GSPDA M28

In the end, the GSPDA M28 was a kickass phone when it originally hit the market. It is a real pity that GSPDA’s devices aren’t known to more customers outside of Hong Kong. However, today, the M70 offers significantly better value…

Traditionally, the German Nexave Palm Community holds a nationwide meeting of Palm OS users on the Friday of the CeBit fair. This meeting is called PUM – and always brings along a few surprises.

This year’s big surprise was brought along by vivomobile – a huge crate full of broken handhelds, planars, parts,.. – they all could be taken home for free(loads of toys for tinkers):
0a The German Palm User Meeting 2008

Clemens Schuchart from the PUG Neuss Podcast held a 30min talk on how to use a Palm(and what to use it for) – while most of this wasn’t really interesting for professionals, beginners still could learn a lot here:
1a The German Palm User Meeting 2008

After that, Palm’s Mr. Weiss had a short presentation and answered a few preprepared questions from the Nexave team. Generally, Mr. Weiss’s answers were rather bland and did not contain anything new or especially interesting:
2a The German Palm User Meeting 2008 2b The German Palm User Meeting 2008 2c The German Palm User Meeting 2008

As always, a load of German Palm freaks was around:
3a The German Palm User Meeting 2008 3b The German Palm User Meeting 2008 3c The German Palm User Meeting 2008

This year, yours truly also had a small booth demoing various handhelds not running on Palm OS. The devices attracted a huge load of onlookers(including some very prominent ones) – many used the opportunity to look at Windows Mobile(and a jailbroken iPod touch):
4a The German Palm User Meeting 2008 4b The German Palm User Meeting 2008

Of course, some StyleTap consulting was also needed:
5a The German Palm User Meeting 2008 5b The German Palm User Meeting 2008

In the end, it was a rather interesting evening – I’ll try to make it there again next year:

Stay tuned for extra stuff(and some surprises) soon!

Dear Readers,
yours truly will be in Hannover this Friday. I will attend the following tradeshows and would be happy see one or more of you:

The CeBit
cb08 logo int Tam Hanna at the CeBit, Palm User Meeting

First of all, I will definitely attend the CeBit – which is one of the biggest computer fairs worldwide. Expect loads of hands-on pictures and interviews to leak out in the coming months!

The German Palm User Meeting
pug Tam Hanna at the CeBit, Palm User Meeting

This year, Tamoggemon Software will have a stand at the Germany-Wide Palm User Meeting in Hannover. Please stop by for a chat, to have a play with a load of devices, and maybe even for a fun game!

The German CeBit tradeshow is commonly known for cool devices, sometimes a load of snow and a great press center. Great – for all those who are let in. For most tradeshows, getting in is a matter of proving that you publish something – not so for the CeBit. I have just received my press card for this year’s trade show – please look below for a comparison to last year’s(on the right):
DSC03258t CeBit press department discriminates bloggers/online mediums...once again

This year’s version states “ONLINE JOURNALIST” right across the Press text – sort of like bloggers are second-class journalists who basically are completely irrelevant to today’s technology world and who are just let in as an act of courtesy from the CeBit media department. Many bloggers have press cards from renowned journalists associations(e.g. yours truly) – but still aren’t worthy of proper treatment in the eyes of the Deutsche Messe AG.

Please keep in mind that this isn’t the first time the Deutsche Messe AG discriminates online mediums(and bearers of press cards not issued by German agencies) – 2000, journalists from really big news sites(e.g. Tom’s Hardware and The Register) were banned from entering the tradeshow). Last year, everything went well – and this year, the bork-ups begin all over again. It feels like a late revenge stunt – hey, we can’t kick you out, but we can still discriminate you by giving you a differently-looking(or stamped) press card.

Dear readers, please help make this public. It may not concern you today, but it will most definitely concern you when your favorite news services can no longer access a trade show or concert which is relevant for you. Please send a link to this article to your favorite news services, and post it to your blog. If you have a Digg account, please digg the article here.

Dear colleagues, feel free to use the image I have posted above in your publications – I hereas place it into public domain(click for bigger version). It may not concern you – but please help us fight back. You could receive an inferior press badge just tomorrow – please spread the word so that this discriminatory practice can be stopped in its roots!

This is an urgent call to all TamsPalm readers based in Austria – the Viennese Palm user Group meets tonight, 19:00 local time.

As always, the meeting place is the Pizza Plus that can conveniently be reached with the U6 subway line(station Alt Erlaa); I will be at the meeting from approx 1915 to 2015.

See you all there!

All pictures are copyright of the Leopold Museum 2007 and their creators. We had to constrain the resolution to VGA and add the texts due to a restrictive contract pressed upon us by the museum administration. We apologize for any inconveniences! – the TamsPalm team

The Leopold Museum in Vienna(shown below) is not the place where one would expect to see any kind of technical innovation worth of a TamsPalm article – but their exhibition titled 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien(24 hours in the life of Vienna) is worth it. The reason for this is simple – all the pictures shown were made with a stock(according to the museum) BlackBerry Pearl smartphone:
0 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl

The exhibition is in two rooms of the top floor. The rest of the museum showed interesting artworks…but hey, this is TamsPalm and not TamsArt. Each room had a showcase with some kind of BlackBerry in the middle. The firs room had a ‘family tree’, the second room’s showcase contained a BlackBerry Pearl with Swarovsky crystals:
1a 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl 1b 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl

The pictures were about 70×50 cm big, with one or two of them being even bigger. All of them looked good from a distance of about one meter – here are a few sample pictures(the Museum forces us to put that text bar over them, sorry):
2a 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl 2b 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl 2c 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl 2d 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl

Here is a closeup of a picture that looked like it was made on a very close range. The strawberries look very natural and accurate from about one meter away – if you come close, you can see the slight ‘fuzzyness’ shown below:
3 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl

Night pictures turned out surprisingly noise-free and looked pretty good:
4a 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl 4b 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl

Chromatic aberrations were not visible either:
5 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl

Pictures shot at daylight contained surprising amounts of detail:
6 24 Stunden im Leben von Wien   the photo exhibition powered by the BlackBerry Pearl

Overall, the pictures shown in the exhibiton were of exceptional quality for a cameraphone – since the exhibition was sponsored by BlackBerry, it’s very probable that the machines used to create these pictures were not exactly stock ones(software and/or CCD upgraded). The images probably also were modified on a workstation. But nevertheless, this exhibition clearly demonstrates what today’s(next-gen) camera phones are capable of capturing when paired with a good postprocessor…interesting viewing for every technology freak!

CNET has a nice assortment of news and history in Palm’s 10th anniversary. Get the full scoop here:
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-11304_7-6474897-1.html?tag=txt

Sometimes, taking a look at the past can be a great experience. Here are a few images of classic handhelds:
The Palm V
The Palm V is a classic handheld. Its sleek shape and metal housing have insipred generations of industry designers, and the machine’s price and its accompanying advertising campaign(featuring naked women) caused loads of controversy. The power button and the digitizer broke down regularily, but the machine still introduced a few legendary features like the electronically adjustable contrast. In fact, a Palm V can even be upgraded to OS4 to run Tamoggemon BinaryClock as a desk clock…

 Classic PalmOS handhelds  Classic PalmOS handhelds

The Palm IIIc
The Palm IIIc basically was a rehash of the III chassis(in black) with a color screen and a rechargeable battery. The machine was ridiculed for the bigger size, but the battery stamina was incredible:

 Classic PalmOS handhelds  Classic PalmOS handhelds  Classic PalmOS handhelds

The color screen was a topic of discussion. It was a TFT, slowed the procesor down and had just 8bit color resolution. Thus, it was difficult to use outdoors and was bad at displaying photos. However, the indoor contrast was incredible, one of the best screns I ever saw and used. By the way, the IIIc could also be updated to OS4:
 Classic PalmOS handhelds  Classic PalmOS handhelds

The Palm Vii
The Palm Vii…was nothing short than a legendary machine. Basically yet another rehash of the trusty III chassis, a model was created with transparent housing for distribution at the DevCon:
 Classic PalmOS handhelds  Classic PalmOS handhelds

The big innovation was the radiotransmitter, it was powered by an internal NiMH battery. A flatrate was offered for the data only service very soon, something that still didnt make it to Europe:
 Classic PalmOS handhelds

The style of the Vii is unparalelled, too bad that Palm killed off the .net service…
 Classic PalmOS handhelds

Miscellaneous stuff
 Classic PalmOS handhelds  Classic PalmOS handhelds
The classical Palm Portable keyboard(a prototype) acompanied he Vii. The keyboard was great, much better than the average notebook keyboard. Nobody knows why Palm discontinued it…

 Classic PalmOS handhelds
These badges were distributed at the DevCons in the USA…

Do you have something to add? Send your photos to Tamog AT gmx DOT at to get them published!

Palm currently celebrates its 10th anniversary. We gathered a few nice retrospectives and other stuff to make you nostalgic:

Pilot 1000 Retrospective
Here are a few images of the original Palm Pilot 1000 that started it all. Find pictures of the case, the hardware and even a copy of the original press release.

http://www.palminfocenter.com/news/8492/happy-10th-anniversary-palm-computing/
PalmInfoCenter also has a nice timeline graph and a few mockup images of PalmOS handhelds.

Archive.org has a few archived scoops of www.palm.com here:
http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.palm.com

Palm itself currently offers free shipping on all orders in the Palm store btw!

BTW; stay tuned. A few images of classic handhelds(V, Vii, IIIc) will follow soon!

I visited the Cebit in Hannover, Germany, and just want to share some of my impressions with you.

As a TamsPalm author I’m interested in mobile computing in general. And of course especially in smartphones and handhelds. At the Cebit one can find many interesting devices and I’ll show you some of them:

For all the Linux-enthusiats the GPS smartphone from ImCoSys might be both interesting and disappointing. One the one hand it’s interesting because it’s running Linux, has integrated GPS, Bluetooht, Wifi, supports Java and VoIP via the SIP standard. On the other hand it might be disappointing for some of you because the Linux Software has been modified and is not an open platform like Debian, Ubuntu and other “normal” Linux distibutions. It’s more like a proprietary OS which means that you cannot easily port Linux programs to this smartphone. The company did this because they wanted one consistent platform and they spent three years for developing this device. The smartphone originally should have been presented in June, but because of the Cebit they showed the prototypes now.

112112266 f034d7af0d m Impressions from Cebit 2006
The ImCoSys smartphone

I could also take a look at some WindowsMobile devices. The Asus P525 has a nice form factor but I could not manage to handle it without the stylus. The joystick had no function and so it was impssible to scroll through the menues. I don’t know if this device was only a prototype and the problem will be fixed or if this is a generall problem.
112112271 7c9aa00890 Impressions from Cebit 2006

I also tested the Ipaq 6xxx mobile messenger (I can’t remember the exact model number). The one-hand navigation is not bad, but you’ll have to use the stylus sometimes.
The Qtec 9100 smartpone is a very interesting device, too. The keyboard is hidden under the screen and slides out when you need it. Then the screen automatically rotates to landscape mode. The 240×320 screen is big enough for emails, PIM and other text-based applications.
Another WinMobile smartphone was presented by BenQ mobile. Its name is P51 and it has integrated GPS and Wifi. This device offered the best one-hand navigation of all WinMobile boxen I tested at the Cebit.

I also wanted to test the Loox T800, but FujitsuSiemens only had one device behind glas:

112019268 4330666afa m Impressions from Cebit 2006

Of course there were not only Linux and WinMobile devices, but also Symbian smartphones. I had a closer look at the Nokia E61. It’s interesting for buisnnes users because it’s one of the phones that has NO camera. It’s very slim and offers full Microsoft Office support: Word, Excel and Powerpoint files can be showed and edited. You can see that Symbian is a mobile phone OS, because the handling is fully based on the keyboard. It has a full QWERTY keyboard and wrintig with it was no problem for me. I like the E61 more than the WinMobile smartphones because Symbian has a more simple GUI which is better adapted for mobile phones.
112019271 5d32e0aef0 m Impressions from Cebit 2006
Nokia E61

At the end of this article, here are some pictures from the “Origami” UMPCs:


112112267 c7b1712bfa m Impressions from Cebit 2006
112112269 2ca1dc8ffa m Impressions from Cebit 2006

I think the idea of this “Ultra Mobile PCs” is not bad, but you should check out if a “normal” TabletPC suits your needs better.

© 2013 TamsPalm - the Palm OS / web OS Blog Suffusion theme by Sayontan Sinha