When the XBox 360 as released long time ago, it was just another console. It was marred by the popularity and prowess of the PS3 and the ingenuity of the Wii.

Wii was the console that popularized the concept of motion gaming going extreme. Soon Sony jumped in by introducing the PlayStation Move, which mimicked the Wii  on a superior and proven console.

What Microsoft did was to introduce the Kinect, the controller without boundaries.

Almost immediately following the launch of Kinect, hobbyists and academics from around the world embraced Kinect possibilities in ways that surprised and delighted. And with the launch of a non-commercial software development kit, we saw even more exciting and creative applications in the areas of healthcare, rehab, education and so much more. As we watched these stories unfold, the term “The Kinect Effect” emerged in hallway conversations at Microsoft as a way to describe the amazing and creative ways Kinect was being used.

What began as pure entertainment had taken a new form altogether. See for yourself

Frank X Shaw over at the Technet blog quotes

Bill Gates once said, “We always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years, and underestimate the change that will occur in the next 10." Last year was an incredible year for the Kinect Effect, and with so many fantastic ideas made real in just the one year, I can’t wait to look back in nine!

Being an avid gamer and having owned a lot of consoles myself, I can vouch that no console is inferior when it comes to gaming and enjoyment, but I must really commend Microsoft and the guys who got this idea to transform the Kinect into something unexpected.

App store content leaders of today are not those of tomorrow, is what the research firm Distimo believes. According to DIstimo

…within this year, Android Market will overtake Apple’s App Store for iPhone to become the largest content market – while both will see growth, Android Market currently has the momentum. There is also a significant shift underway among the smaller stores, with Nokia’s Ovi Store set to slip from fourth place to sixth place, while Microsoft’s WP7 Marketplace will move from sixth to fourth.

Apple’s App Store for iPad is currently holding its third place, while RIM’s BlackBerry App World is holding station in fifth.

Noticeably, 4 percent of products on the App Store for iPhone feature in-app purchases, these account for 76 percent of revenue. Free apps with in-app purchases account for 52 percent of the total revenue, with paid apps with in-app purchasing accounting for 24 percent. The remaining 24 percent is generated by traditional paid apps.

Android is not far behind in this model. Android in-app purchases were only introduced in March 2011. 76 percent of the top-25 grossing US apps are free titles monetised through in-app purchases.

The growth of tablets meant that the content has to be suited to the tablet form factor. Though the featurephones will never be extinct, the smartphone use is inarguably on the rise, and so is the number of apps downloaded. The research pointed that North America, Europe and Asia are now “almost equal in size” in download terms.

Research firm Berg Insight has claimed that the number of apps downloaded globally will grow at a compound annual growth rate of 56.6 percent between 2010 and 2015, taking the total to 98 billion at the end of the period.

….revenues from paid applications, in-app purchases and subscription services – so called direct revenues – reached € 1.6 billion in 2010.

…direct app store revenues to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 40.7 percent to reach € 8.8 billion in 2015.

Apple’s App Store is forecast to remain at the Numero Uno spot during this period, followed by Android and Windows Phone.

Johan Svanberg, Senior Analyst quoted

Even though the download numbers will increase during the forecast period, most apps are free to download and app monetisation will be a challenge for developers.

Free to download monetisation strategies such as in-app advertising and in-app purchasing will be increasingly important. This is especially true in the APAC region, which will account for over 40 percent of all mobile app downloads in 2015.

He said that the future belongs to new web technologies such as HTML5, which would replace the native apps. Developers should not see the web and native technologies as “mutual exclusives” and should target the web and mobile platforms logically and strategically.

Well guess what? MSFT has blown the trumpet. It is now openly inviting webOS devs to develop for Windows Phone 7.

According to a tweet by Brandon Watson – senior director of Windows Phone 7 development at Microsoft.

Brandon-Watson-webOS-tweet

Watson is the same man who had recently bet $1,000 on Windows Phone 7 with the author of popular comic strip Dilbert.

With webOS devs hitting the panic button, MSFT will surely be luring a lot of devs to develop on the Windows Phone 7 platform.

For Watson it’s a simple approach. “Someone asked me why,” he said over Twitter. “Because every developer matters, that’s why.”

Stay tuned for more…!!!!

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